Make your own free website on Tripod.com

V - RIGGING

Home
ABOUT US
TRAINING CONCEPTS
MOMMAS, BUDDIES, & LEADERS
HOOF TRIM TRAINING
BITS 101
V - RIGGING
PAST SALES

V rigging is a method of fastening your saddle, from both front and back saddle rings, to the front cinch by means of long latigos that ends up in a V shape.  It may also be called "center fire" as the cinch can be adjusted all the way back to center. Then the rigging has the appearence of a true center fire rigged saddle.  I seldom place the cinch back past 7/8ths or 3/4.
 
The advantage of V rigging is that it can be used to move the cinch back out towards the rear the girth area where the cinch does not tend to gall the horse.  This rigging also holds the back of the saddle down snug, even when the back cinch may be somewhat loose. (Yes, you can still use a back cinch along with the V rigging.)
 
Both sides of the saddle are rigged with latigos, in a mirror image to each other. (No offside billet is used.)  The latigos need to be about 6 feet long.
 
*Notes on Saddling Safety*
1. Your latigos are like vehicle brake pads, in that they wear out. When they go bad you need to install new ones.
 
2. Never oil your latigos. Baby powder will make them slide through the rings and over the laps easier.
 
3. Your front cinch gets connected first and removed last when saddling.  Never put your breast collar, back cinch, britchen, or crupper, in place if the front cinch is not fastened up first.
 
4. Always make sure your front cinch is connected to your back cinch with the little hobble strap.

EMERGENCY METHOD
vremergency.jpg
DO NOT RIDE WHEN RIGGED THIS WAY

This is an emergency V rigging method.  If your horse gets galled in the girth area, V rigging like this can be used to move the cinch back off of the gall. It can be done with a common, short length, latigo. 
 
It is important to note that a saddle should not be ridden in rigged in this fashion. The 3-hole lacing knot (red arrow) is not strong enough on it's own to hold the saddle with a rider. It will break under stress, if not covered with another lap of the latigo.  But this method will allow the horse to carry the saddle back to camp.

Method 1 (knot on rear saddle ring)

STEP 1
vrstep1.jpg

STEP 2
vrm1step2.jpg

Start your latigo in the normal fashion.  Go down through the inside of the cinch ring (step 1) and then back up to the front saddle ring and in through the outside of it, coming out and down from the back (step 2).

STEP 3
vrm1step3.jpg

STEP 4
vrm1step4.jpg

Then head down through the inside of the cinch ring again as you would if you were going to buckle it with the cinch ring tongue (step 3).  But instead of buckling it you take it up to the back saddle ring and through from the outside (step 4).  Tie it off at that point (step 5).  If you prefer to buckle the strap instead of tying off, you can come back down through the cinch ring and buckle it with the tongue (alt. step 6).

STEP 5
vrm1tieoff.jpg

ALTERNANT STEP 5
vrm1buckled.jpg

This method puts the knot on the back saddle ring, out of the way of the riders leg. It also puts 2/3rds of the tension on the front saddle ring.

Method 2 (knot on front saddle ring)

STEP 1
vrstep1.jpg

STEP 2
vrm2step2.jpg

Starting in the same way as Method 1, go down through the inside of the cinch ring with the latigo (step 1).  Next take it back to the rear saddle ring and in through the outside of the ring  and down (step 2).

STEP 3
vrm2step3.jpg

STEP 4
vrm2tieoff.jpg

Thread the latigo back down through the inside of the cinch ring again (step 3).  Then go up to the front saddle ring with the latigo and tie it off (step 4). 
 
If you prefer to buckle the latigo, instead of tying off, then you take it through the front ring, from the outside, and go back down to the cinch ring from the inside and buckle it with the cinch ring tongue (alt. step 4). 

ALTERNET STEP 4
vrm2buckled.jpg

Method 2 applies tension more evenly between the saddle rings.  It also allows the end flap of the latigo to hang in a rearward fashion when using the buckle to fasten it. 
 
When tying it off, the knot is up front where it can rub against your leg.  If your front saddle ring is rigged "full" as the one in the photo is, then the knot stays out in front of your leg.  If your front saddle ring is rigged 7/8ths or 3/4 then it may be a problem.

LATIGO PUT AWAY
latigoputaway.jpg

CINCHES PUT AWAY
cinchsputaway.jpg

Before removing the saddle I like to put the latigo away on the near side as shown in the first photo, above.  It is not looped through and tied off. It is folded in from the back so it draps over the ring before tying off.  Then when cinching up I can, in one motion, break the knot open, slide my fingers to the end of the latigo and  thread it down through the cinch ring while it unfolds out of the ring.
 
When putting away my cinches on the off side I like to run the cinch keeper through the buckles while holding them upside down (A).  This allows my cinches to hang without a twist in them (B&C) as in the second photo, above.

steve@huddlestonenterprises.org